Pamela Jo Johnson, MPH, PhD, FACE

Mary J. Berg Distinguished Professor of Women’s Health 
Associate Professor and Chair 
640R Aldevron Tower
701.231.6323

Pamela.Jo.Johnson@ndsu.edu


Education

Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Health Services Research/Survey Research, 2004-2005
University of Minnesota 

Doctor of Philosophy, Epidemiology, 2004
University of Minnesota 

Master of Public Health, Community Health Education 1999
University of Minnesota 

Bachelor of Arts, Sociology, 1995
University of Minnesota 

Research Interests and Areas of Expertise 

  • Women’s health
  • Maternal and infant health
  • Mental health/illness
  • Midlife and healthy aging
  • American Indian health
  • Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) 
  • Health and healthcare disparities/equity
  • Survey research methods
  • Health services epidemiology
  • Social epidemiology
  • Secondary data analysis with national health surveys, vital statistics (natality/mortality) data, electronic health records (EHR) data

Professional Memberships

Fellow, American College of Epidemiology
Member, Society for Epidemiologic Research
Member, Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research
Member, Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health
Member, American Public Health Association
Member, North Dakota Public Health Association 

Courses

PH 754: Health Survey Research [Spring] 

Selected Publications

  1. Johnson PJ, Jou J Upchurch D. (2021). Unmet healthcare needs among midlife adults with mental distress and multiple chronic conditions. Aging and Mental Health, Online ahead of print: Apr 1;1-9. 
  2. Johnson PJ, Jou J Upchurch D. (2020). Psychological distress and access to care among midlife women. Journal of Aging and Health, 32 (5-6): 317-327.
  3. Johnson PJ, Jou J Upchurch D. (2019). Healthcare disparities among US women of reproductive age by level of psychological distress. Journal of Women’s Health, 28(9):1286-1294.
  4. Johnson PJ, Jou J, Rockwood TH, Upchurch D. (2019). Perceived benefit of using complementary and alternative medicine by race/ethnicity in midlife and older adults in the US. Journal of Aging and Health, 31(8):1376-1397.
  5. Johnson PJ, O’Brien M, Orionzi D, Trahan L, Rockwood T. (2019). A pilot in community-based diabetes self-management support for patients at an urban primary care clinic. Diabetes Spectrum, 32(2):157-163.
  6. Rhee TG, Evans R, McAlpine D, Johnson PJ. (2017). Racial/ethnic differences in the use of complementary and alternative medicine in US adults with moderate mental distress: results from National Health Interview Survey. J of Primary Care & Community Health, 8(2):43-54. 
  7. Johnson PJ, Jou J, Rhee G, Rockwood TH, Upchurch D. (2016). Complementary health approaches for health and wellness in midlife and older US adults. Maturitas, 89:36-42.
  8. Johnson PJ, Kozhimannil KB, Jou J, Ghildayal N, Rockwood TH. (2016). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among women of reproductive age in the United States. Women’s Health Issues, 26(1):40-47.
  9. Johnson PJ, Ghildayal N, Rockwood TH, Everson-Rose SA. (2014). Differences in diabetes self-care activities by race/ethnicity and insulin use. The Diabetes Educator, 40(6):767-777. 
  10. Gjerdingen D, McGovern P, Attanasio L, Johnson PJ, Kozhimannil KB. (2014). Maternal depressive symptoms, employment, and social support. JABFM, 7(1):87-96.
  11. Johnson PJ, Blewett LA, Call KT, Davern ME. (2010). American Indian/Alaska Native uninsurance disparities: A comparison of 3 surveys. American Journal of Public Health, 100(10):1972-79.
  12. Johnson PJ, Carlson KF, Hearst MO. (2010). Healthcare disparities for American Indian veterans in the United States: A population-based study.  Medical Care, 48(6):563-569. PMCID: PMC2926126
  13. Johnson PJ, Call KT, Blewett LA. (2010). The importance of geographic data aggregation in assessing disparities in American Indian prenatal care. American Journal of Public Health, 100(1):122-128.
  14. Johnson PJ, Oakes JM, Anderton DL. (2008). Neighborhood poverty and American Indian infant death: are the effects identifiable? Annals of Epidemiology, 18(7):552-559.
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